District 12 Is For Sale

District 12 Is For Sale

For the Hunger Games fan with $1.4 million burning a hole in their pocket!
When the Hunger Games movie producers went scouting for a location for the impoverished Appalachian coal mining region District 12, they found a perfect match: Henry River Mill Village, in rural North Carolina. 
 
Best of all, for the purposes of making the movie, the town had been abandoned 25 years ago. Not only would this make it easy to film without inconveniencing the neighbors, it also lent every aspect of the town a run down, ramshackle look - perfect for achieving that elusive quality of "District 12-ness" necessary for a really accurate portrayal of Katniss Everdeen's home town.
 
Now that filming has ended, the town is up for sale. Haven't you ever wanted a whole entire town to call your own? Now you can have one, and with a famous provenance to boot! District 12 is up on for sale for only $1.4 million dollars. Surely you could recoup some of that cost just by running tours to the town for Hunger Games fans!

$1.4 will only barely buy you a single family home in some parts of the country. But in North Carolina's Burke County, it can buy you 72 acres of property, plus many locations used in the shooting of the movie, including the Everdeen house and the Mellark's bakery. 
 
Currently, Henry River Mill Village is owned by an 83 year-old man named Wade Shepherd. He lives next door to the abandoned village, which he purchased in order to protect his privacy from potential land developers. But now he's ready to sell, because in the wake of the movie, he has been "bombarded with visitors."
 
I am reminded of Forks, WA, the real-world town which Stephanie Meyer used as the setting for her Twilight novels. Forks has embraced its fame, and several enterprising locals are running tours and capitalizing on Twilight mania. Surely you could do the same, if you bought District 12!
 
Henry River Mill Village was once a fully self-sustaining town. The Henry River Manufacturing Company built the town to support its textile mill, which began producing cotton yarn in 1905. Residents of the company town worked back-breaking 12-hour shifts round the clock at the mill's 12,000 spindles. The mill shut down in the early 1970s, and most of the residents left. In 1977 the mill burned down. The town's last resident vacated the property in 1987, and it stood as a ghost town for decades, until being reborn as a famous movie set.