I Now Pronounce You Adam and Kevin

I Now Pronounce You Adam and Kevin

Adam Sandler’s achieved the sort of notoriety only a few folks attain from working in comedy. Seinfeld’s got it, but not too many other folks. Steve Carell, maybe. But that’s it. For his generation Sandler represents all the things Uncle Milty did for older folks. There aren’t variety shows Sandler works on any longer, he already did his time on SNL. So, turning to the big screen and remaining a tremendous box office draw from the better part of fifteen years is bound to result in criticism. It’s been figured that Sandler only makes features when he can include all his friends in the proceedings. There’s, usually, a bit about those movies being vacuous. But wouldn’t we all rather work with people we’re familiar with on goofy projects than being deadly serious in an office somewhere, pressured by bullshit? Right.

Anyway, I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry is one of those movies people are bound to damn considering it’s cast includes Kevin James alongside Sandler as the pair goes in on a spate of dick jokes suited only for rarified air in dorm rooms and smoke filled living rooms. That shouldn’t read as being detrimental. But unless a film makes some monolithic statement about culture or redefines an historic figure, it seems the press is ready to damn just about anything.

It could be figured that I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry addresses homosexuality in a unique manner. The film finds the James character needing to marry in order to bestow his worldly possessions to someone in the event he dies, leaving his children uncared for. Sandler’s character, being the guy’s closest friend, goes along with the gay marriage thing. This being a comedy, however, more than a few problems arise.

Firstly, there’s an investigation from the insurance company, who over time, have realized that gay marriage is being used to defraud businesses. Of course, James and Sandler are guilty, but the remainder of the film finds the two men emboldening gay rights protesters and befriending a hot lawyer. The Sandler character – and this might be another criticism – parades around with an endless succession of beautiful women. But who wouldn’t want to do that and get paid? The gallivanting eventually gets the pair into trouble. Since it’s a comedy, though, there’s a relatively happy ending, if not hilarious. And of course, Sandler pocketed a godly sum of money for his efforts.