Sideways and Paul Giamatti Landing Hot Chicks

Sideways and Paul Giamatti Landing Hot Chicks

Thomas Haden Church didn’t write or direct Sideways, but we might his appearing in the film might mitigate his conception of Rolling Kansas.

Anyway, this flick right here assisted Paul Giamatti in becoming more than just a guy people thought of as the ugly dude who could act. The film again proved that he could in fact act, but perhaps more importantly, that he was capable of carrying a film. Granted there’re at least three other actors who might be considered Sideways’ focus, but none manage to out stripe Giamatti.

The weird thing about this feature, though, is that it takes the increasingly pervasive downer-writer character struggling with making art (read: anything by Noah Baumbach) and sets him in a situation that doesn’t revolve around his craft. It all still rings a bit hollow when Giamatti’s Miles character talks to Jack, as played by Haden Church, about waiting for his agent to call. But the scenario feels less contrived than Greenberg, let’s say.

The plot, though, isn’t too much more than a vacation cum love story. And for some reason, it doesn’t come off as ridiculous. Granted, there’s perhaps more drinking in Sideways than any of the five highest grossing films currently being shown in the States, but the movie is credited for spurring on a brief and probably now forgotten interest in wine. I’d like to think that there’re now more wino’s roving the streets, homeless, than before Sideways was released in 2004.

What the entire thing boils down to, however, is the fact that this was all just another romantic comedy – albeit with actors skewing  older than in other iterations of this formula. So, Miles and Jack head to some wine country in Southern California to blow off steam prior to the latter character’s wedding the following week. As to be expected, the prospect of fresh vagina’s too much for Jack to pass up and finds himself involved with a single mother and saying lovely things a bit too frequently for a guy whose set to be married in a few days.

Miles gets caught up in the whole thing when he gets mixed up with the woman’s friend eventually – and accidentally – reveals the indiscretions taking place. Somehow, even as Giamatti remains the film’s focus, it becomes increasingly easy to dislike not just him, but everyone else in the movie. What’s worse is the completely unrealistic ending which involves an unexpected phone message. That said, there’re worse ways to spend two hours.