Way of the Tosser: A Mockumentary from Canada

Way of the Tosser: A Mockumentary from Canada

If you grew up listening to or watching media springing from Great Britain, you already know what the word ‘tosser’ denotes. If not, google it and find out why the title to his movie is amusing in more than one way. It’ll be worth the time, guaranteed.

Rock Paper Scissors: The Way Of The Tosser did the rounds at festivals a few years back and was able to garner a bit of positive press, even if the interwebs haven’t always cast an enthusiastic vote. But with a feature as peculiar as this one, there’s good reason why a spate of normals didn’t quite get the whole thing.

Focusing on the Gary and his girlfriend Holly in the weeks and days leading up to the rock, paper, scissors championship shouldn’t have probably even become a movie. The fact that it did, though, points to the filmmaker’s dedication to bizarro comedy.

Shot in a mockumentary style, Way of the Tosser is all personal views on competition and superfluous scenes detailing Gary practicing his throws. It’s odd to watch a mustachioed man pump three times and throw some sign symbolizing a marker in a game played by children, but that’s what it is.

Endearing the feature to anyone with an hour and change to watch this thing is the relationship of the two principal characters (and their weird roommate, who by film’s end garners a show featuring his photography). Gary and Holly have plans to marry. And their friendship with the couple next-door points the way towards normalcy. Of course, Gary fancies himself some sort of super-star, a feeling not necessarily bared out by the general public. But that’s why the entire thing is amusing.

Amping up the ridiculous nature, but good naturedness, of the film is Gary’s arch nemesis, who viewers get a brief introduction to prior to the proper competition. With all the lead up time and talk of varying strategies finding its way into the championship, the end of the film is something of a mighty let down. Staving off disaster, though, are the interpersonal relationships the movie aptly displays. Of course, The Way of the Tosser would have come off drastically different if the color palette of the film would have been conceived differently.

It’s a movie made for geeks, who abhor mainstream fair. It’s a feature that didn’t have a chance at finding widespread distribution, but did. It’s a feature worth watching, if only once.